Guild of Thieves

This time, it’s the rouges’ turn!

Thief

The organization known in my Heartlands setting as “The Fingers” is nevertheless a rather generic take on a Thieves’ Guild which might give the rest of you some good ideas.

It’s tempting to make a guild like this into a supremely powerful criminal organization involved in all sorts of activities and also a power-player in local politics, but I’ve tried to steer clear of that; PC:s who elect to stay out of the guild should have a fighting chance at surviving as independents, or this kind of organization risks stifling the creativity of the players.

Mechanically, I’ve tried to give this guild the same focus as many thief players – money. The possibility to store your wealth (both stolen and dug out of dungeons) away from the prying eyes of the law should appeal to most rogues, and of course the organization will also both supply a service and make an income on dealing in stolen goods.

My rules for the Thieves’ GuildĀ can be downloaded here, or inĀ the Library.

Advertisements

Guild of Mages

Continuing with my musings on Class Guilds, I turn my attention to magic users. To me, a mage’s guild is a gentleman’s club of sorts, where wizards and their ilk can meet on somewhat neutral grounds despite being in fierce competition otherwise – a place where disputes between individuals who wield enormous power might be defused before they spill into the general community and hurt all wizards or start witch hunts.

Another issue arises with the introduction of the “Aesoterium”, a store for buying magical items that is open not only to guild members but (at increased rates) even to non-members. I know there are a lot of opinions about whether magical items should be for sale at all, and if so how and where. I strongly believe so, as long as the game gives the ability to formally create them in some way which has a measured cost.

For scrolls, potions and similar items there is an easily discernible cost – the money invested by the mage on creating the item, the resources that were spent making it and a premium for the time and risk required simply to learn how to perform this feat. I see no reason why wizards would not supplement their income and fund their experiments by brewing potions and making scrolls and selling these – and so, in my campaign world, they do.

I don’t usually allow sales of items that are not one-use, however. These items should have a more unique feel, to my mind. Of course they are both bought and sold; everything is, as everything has a price. It’s just that I think this is more about having them commissioned or private deals away from prying eyes. Also, my permanent magic items commonly have severe drawbacks or involve some sort of rather dark magic, which means they often need to be sold covertly.

My rules for the Mage’s Guild can be downloaded here, or in the Library. To clarify, a laboratory or library is used in LotFP to create potions or scrolls during downtime.

Class Guilds

I’ve been taking a look at different organizations in my campaign world recently – it all started when my players asked me for a bank or other solution for storing excess money. I’m not a big fan of this, and I’d rather see them spend their money, but I also believe in taking your players’ wishes seriously so I made some outlines for a punishingly expensive way of storing excessive wealth…

Working out the quick details about the bank, my rogue player asked me “well, what if I wanted to keep my money with the thieves’ guild?”. Part of his back story was that he was an actual member of the local guild, but we hadn’t determined anything about it yet. It was a good idea, however, and I let him use his guild as a bank at a lower rate.

The whole thing got me thinking, and also reminiscing about old computer games and adventures – where are the Fighter’s Guild and Mage’s Guild? I guess they fell by the wayside somewhere along with actually speaking of character class in-game, but I still love the concept. I started tinkering with the idea, and developed a few concepts for what these guilds might be and what benefits they might offer to members.

My first is a take on the Fighter’s Guild; the Condumbra, an association for mercenaries and sell-swords meant mostly to take contracts and ensure that contracts are honored in a realm where the rule of law is not always a given. It is also a primary source for armed hirelings for characters, and membership ensures that you can recruitthese more effectively.

You can take a look at the Fighter’s Guild PDF here, or find it in the Library.

The Oath of the Guild is “borrowed” word-for-word from the beautiful and simple hireling rules written by Telecanter on his blog, and the rules for hirelings are also heavily inspired by his system.